Saturday, March 8, 2008

Who's your columnist #7

Your comment must be posted by 30 minutes before the Tuesday March 18 class.
You must include the URL so that others can read the column, too.
Let me know if you have any questions.
Have a great Spring Break (I'm in Fort Lauderdale!).
See you in class.

19 comments:

Elliot Fox said...

“For Nats and Fans, There’s a Price” by Tom Boswell

In this story Boswell compares the costs to attend a game at the National’s new stadium to what other MLB team’s prices are. Boswell discusses most importantly that the prices vary from ballpark to ballpark and that it is very hard to put an exact pricing on all of the seats in a ballpark.
Every ballpark in the MLB offers its own characteristics and with these differences some seats cost more at other stadiums compared to others. Tom Boswell covers how the seats are going to be priced at the new National’s Stadium.
Boswell uses creative writing skills in order to pitch out the difference between National’s Park seats and those as other stadiums. Along with his skilful writing he refers back to the past once and again to relate how in the 1970’s baseball wasn’t so focused on pricing of seats.
All in all it will be a good season to see the Nationals. Prices are relative to those of other stadiums. This is a learning year most definitely for the Nationals and next year there will be changes if seats are no filled.

To read more go to:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/12/AR2008031203864.html?sub=AR

Latonya said...

"Jeff Mayweather making his own mark "

By Tim Smith

This article tells of the obvious differences between Jeff and Floyd Mayweather. The opening paragraph immediately states the purpose of the column, and is straight-forward.

Smith tends to be very straight-forward in his writing. His style is simple, and he rarely plays with his leads, yet that are still captivating for the reader.

Instead of discussing one topic in the entire column, Smith used a personal note about Jeff to give background information on an upcoming fight against Sultan Ibragimov. This was an interesting way of telling a story that could have been told cut and dry with just the facts.

Smith often goes straight to the point, but he creates a spin that gives the reader more information a little at a time.

Here is the link for your reading pleasure:

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more_sports/2008/02/22/2008-02-22_jeff_mayweather_making_his_own_mark.html

Anonymous said...

"Isiah takes the heat, but Bird should be in same boat"

By: Scoop Jackson

In this write up Jackson gives insight into the Knicks and Pacers horrible seasons and the different scrutiny that Isiah Thomas and Larry Bird face.
Isiah Thomas is coming up on the end of his first year on his four year contract extension. Many fans are angry and upset that Thomas is still coaching and are outraged at the teams performance. Scoop also takes a look at how the Pacers are in bad shape just like the Knicks, yet Larry Bird is not catching as much slack as Thomas.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=jackson/080312&sportCat=nba

Sean said...

"A Rooting Interest--NCAA tourney more interesting with a team we can love" by Bob Ryan

On March 17, Bob Ryan wrote a typically interesting and humorous column about the selection of the NCAA tournament field. Unlike other stories I have seen, he was not writing about who got left out and who would win.

Instead, he made the point the NCAA tournament is really three tournaments, with each weekend being its own tournament. The tournament is the most fun the first weekend are the upsets on the first weekend a lower seed beats a higher seed.

According to Ryan, last year was boring. Two years ago, when Mason made its run to the Final Four, was the best.

As Ryan put it: "So what we need for this to be a proper NCAA Tournament is for someinstantly lovable non-mainstream team to emerge. Someone, for example, like Davidson."

He continues to discuss other potential lovable underdogs who might emerge. He includes George Mason.

The article is at:

www.boston.com/sports/colleges/mens_basketball/articles/2008/03/17/a_rooting_interest/

Phil Murphy said...

"Hope springs eternal in March"
BY: JIM CAPLE

Caple uses an easy-to-read format in this column to mock both poor and unfortunate Spring Training performances by baseball players and teams.

The column is written as a list of 16 fictitious quotes of unnamed, but often obviously identifiable, Major-League teams. The quotes are what members of the teams are likely thinking with the regular season weeks away, but would never say aloud.

Caple attracts the reader with a four-word lead that immediately draws to the body of his column and alternates shorter and longer quotes. This layout-- whether deliberate or incidental-- allows the reader to advance deeper into the column without feeling burdened by a Jurassic block of text.

Caple caps the story with a "Box Score of the Week" and an actual quote from Mariners pitcher Jarrod Washburn. This gives the reader some variety towards the end of the piece, which ideally increases the amount of time spent reading.

However, a scrolling reader may see this-- as I did-- and skip the final few quotes of the first section of body for the welcomed change of pace in the kicker.

Click Here for Caple's Column

Eric said...

Biting the hand that feeds the most needy

By Mitch Albom

In this story Albom finds an issue revolving the Detroit city council in one of the dumbest mistakes he has ever seen. The was that Albom leads into the article is draws the reader in for its sense of frustration and anger towards the subject.

After Albom makes his opinion in the beginning he lets the details tell the story by provided the most pertinent information for his audiences.

The quotes and transitions Albom uses really help to build and gain the readers attention to continue throughout this article.

The issue that Albom was writing about dealt with issues of race and racism, but he wrote very well in the way in which he was able to stay very neutral in his story being what seemed to me as completely unbiased.



http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080316/COL01/803160589/1082/COL01

Nadia said...

Manning Finds a Home on KU's Bench
By- Joe Posnanski

I was a little disapointed by Posnanski's latest blog. It did not have his normal flare and passion with words. It did not seem like he was as interested in Manning finding a home on ku's bench as he was in baseball.

He sites off more facts then normal and does not compare them to as many innuendos as he normally does.

He tries with the beginning of the story by talking about how Manning does not want any more fame because he's had enough but it just does not have Posnanski's normal flare to it.

http://www.kansascity.com/180/story/534308.html

matt said...

Dawning of the Knight Era at ESPN

This article by Leonard Shapiro is an incredibly interesting one because anything that has to do with Bob Knight is probably going to be interesting. Shapiro writes about the fact that Bob Knight is going to be working with ESPN throughout March Madness as a commentator. One of the interesting points he foucuses on is the fact that throughout Knight's career, he constantly talked about how much he dislikes the media, he is now a part of the media. He also talks with Jeremy Schaap about his interview with Knight when he basically called him an amateur. Schaap had some interesting things to add as well. I agree with the idea that it's going to be really interesting to see how it works out.

matt said...

sorry I forgot to give the link. You can find this article at www. washingtonpost.com+

Will said...

"Jayhawks have what it takes for a long NCAA run" by Jason Whitlock

This week, Whitlock talks about KU's chances in the upcoming NCAA tournament. He is enthusiastic about the Jayhawks chances to make at least a final four run.

The story, as always, is well written. What really stood out to me was that there were only two quotes in a two-page story. Whitlock is always good about not over using quotes.

If you would like to read the story here is the URL:
http://www.kansascity.com/sports/columnists/jason_whitlock/story/534353.html

Danny U to You said...

Tournament Offers So Much More, and This Year It's Needed
By: MICHAEL WILBON

The more I read Wilbons articles the more I feel like I know the guy. He has a personable way of writing that makes the reader feel as though he is talking to him.
This article deals with the mediocrity of this years NCAA tournament. Wilbon discusses how there are no dazzle teams in the field and how an exciting tournament might save the college basketball season. Overall a good article, but the beginning threw me off a bit. Wilbon sounds repetetive in his first two paragraphs.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/16/AR2008031602561.html

Dylan said...

"Appreciating Hansbrough isn't a matter of race, just basketball" by Gene Wojciechowski

In his latest story, Gene Wojciechowski writes about how many people seem to feel that Tyler Hansbrough get so much media attention because he is white. Wojciechowski believes that is outrageous and say that the reason that he get so much attention is that he is the No. 1 player on the No. 1 team and he is having a monster season statistically. Wojciechowski notes some respected journalists who have even agreed with the sentiment that Hansbrough's attention is more to his skin color then anything else. You can feel Wojciechowski's outrage as he writes about this.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/columns/story?id=3297944&sportCat=ncb

ambar said...

"Missing a Chance To Erase All Doubt" by Sally Jenkins

In this article, Jenkins talks about the Georgetown Hoyas and their awful loss to Pittsburg.

According to the Georgetown basketball team, critics focused too much on what the Hoyas didn't do, instead of what they did. Jenkins pretty much fights with this idea as she talks about the Hoyas' awful loss to Pittsburg.

It seemed to me that Jenkins didn't think the Hoyas got lucky and won many close games. However, she thinks after the game with Pittsburg, the Hoyas did not do anything to resolve any doubts about their "perfectly respectable yet somehow still unpersuasive 27-5 record."

Everything pretty much fell apart in this final game where the Hoyas were never close to winning.

For anyone who is interested, here is the URl:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/16/AR2008031600069.html

Carlos said...

"Rockies need Cook to eat up innings, wins"

By Woody Paige

This article talks about Aaron Cook, who according to Paige, is called Cookie and wants to be a monster. His performance so far this spring has been good, and the papers are ordering 14 wins from the Cooks' menu.

Cook's expectations for this season are high, and Paige describes him as a skilled pitcher and beloved teammate that needs to perform well for the Rockies to have contention.

The article is well constructed, giving insight into Cook's career performance, his skill level at this point, and what we could expect from him this season.

Cookie shouldn't crumble.

Here's the link:

http://www.denverpost.com/paige/ci_8607593

Jeremy said...

How Troy Percival became the maitre d' of Tampa Bay
by Jayson Stark

Jayson Stark's most recent column is about Troy Percival, a 38-year-old relief pitcher for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Percival, who will be the Rays' closer, had chronic arm problems for a while and was out of baseball. He has not closed a game in over 2 years, but was highly coveted during the offseason, garnering an $8 million deal from the Rays.

Stark's column does an excellent job of exploring the "intangibles" that Percival brings to the table to explain why he was so highly coveted. Sure, it didn't hurt that Percival pitched 40 strong innings to close out the 2007 season with the Cardinals, but he also brings a lot of positive energy to a team, according to Stark.

I thought it was interesting how much attention Stark paid to the less-obvious things that made Percival such an appealing target during offseason transactions. Anyone can see what he does on the field, but Stark took it a step further and talked about all of the less-obvious things that teammates love about Percival. It really humanizes him and makes him seem less distant as a player.

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/spring2008/columns/story?columnist=stark_jayson&id=3293015

-Jeremy

Robert said...

"Cubs ready to make turn for home," by Chris De Luca

In his latest article, De Luca notes the changes the Chicago Cubs have made from last season.

Manager Lou Pinella took over the Cubs in 2007. This season, Pinella said that with a year of experience managing the team, this year's spring training has been easier.

Pinella tinkered with the lineup throughout the 2007 season. This year, he has maintained a consistent lineup, which first baseman Derrek Lee said should be beneficial to the team.

Cubs General Manager Jim Hendry admitted he did not envision the Cubs slow start last season. But now that the team is used to each other and Pinella's managerial style, Hendry said that "it will start to come together now."

It probably took time for the Cubs to get adjusted to Pinella's style, but a slow start this year cannot be blamed on that. It will be interesting to see how the Cubs start the season now that they are relatively healthy.

Mike Coppinger said...

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/080312

To An Athlete Dying Young
By Bill Simmons

Simmmons writes about a funeral he attended for Jamiel Andrew Shaw, a football prep star from Los Angeles. He was a great kid who did all the right things and yet he met a tragic end.

Simmons spoke about how so many kids in ghettos don't reach the age of 18. How Jamiel's father had the 18-year plan, a plan for his son to reach the age of 18.

He was gunned down by Lation gangbangers. No one knows whether or not he would have become a great football player, but the point is that the promise was there.

Great column from Simmons and takes a turn from his usual satirical columns.

stephen ball said...

Mike Wise had a plethera of articles to choose from this week heading into NCAA tournament.

I've chosen his article about the American University Eagles.

In a true "get out and vote" fashion, Wise urges DC area residents to get out and support a great underdog story heading into this years March Madness.

It really is a great story because Wise gave a significant amount of coverage to a team that while located in a major market, receives little or no coverage.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/09/AR2008030902129.html

Anonymous said...

"Rodgers Ready to Take Over"

By: Peter King

This article is about the relationship of the new Green Bay Packers quarterback with his team and former legendary starting quarterback.

It talks about how the transition for Aaron Rodgers wasn't an easy one because teammates felt a little treatened by Rodgers coming in to replace Brett Favre.

Three seasons later though Rodgers has "won 'em over" said Favre referring to his former teammmates.

This article should reassure Packers fans and football fans in general that Green Bay will move on and do what it takes to win.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2008/writers/peter_king/03/11/mailbag/index.html