Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Mike Wise: 3 things

GRADED EXERCISE: In the comments section below, add the three things you learned from Mike Wise's presentation. Deadline is 30 minutes before class on Tuesday April 8.

18 comments:

Dechele said...

Mike Wise: 3 things

The three things I learned form Mike Wise were;

1) Your relationship with sources is so valuable. It is important to not forget about them once the story is over. People will pay off down the road.

2) Anytime you can go ther, go there. There is no substitute for it no matter what the cost is.

3) Anytime you can get someone away from their work and peers it makes the biggest difference.

Sean said...

Three things I learned from Mike Wise:

1) Not a bad idea to call and verify a story with an interviewee. It will develop the relationship and permit you to keep in touch with a source.

2. When writing a column, Wise will go the game with some ideas or angles in mind, but it can always change during the event.

3. Reporting is research. Wise used as an example his long article on Gilbert Areanas. Wise went to the streets of Miami to attempt to locate Gilbert's mother, whom Gilbert did not know at all.

Elliot said...

Three things I learned from Mike Wise:

1. In order to get a good story, try taking the athlete you are writing about out of their work zone. Try getting them out of the locker room so that they are not pressured to act a certain way around their team.

2. No matter where you are from and what your background is like you can make it in journalism.

3. Know that different people take different things from a story. Every reader is different and will read your story from a different angle.

Mike Coppinger said...

1. Build relationships early.

2. No substitute for going there. Get the paper to pay for it and go straight to the source.

3. Get the players or coaches out of their work environment. You'll get better quotes.

Eric said...

Three things I learned from Mike Wise:

1. In interviewing it can make all the difference in taking the subject out of their work area. They tend to feel more comfortable without their coaches and peers around.

2. Anytime you can go there, go there. There is no substitute to not go whatever the cost is, because of the invaluable information that you can obtain.

3. Side project stories can make or break it in the journalism profession. Hard work and going the extra mile can sometimes pay-off well in the long run.

Will said...

Mike Wise 3 Things

1. It is important to build and maintain good relationships with your sources.

2. You can get better interviews with sources if you can get them out of their professional environment.

3. You do not have to go to a big name, prestigious school to be a great journalist.

DannyU said...

3 Things From Mike Wise:

1. I found how Mike believes getting the athlete you are interviewing out of the work environment is important. How he was able to get Pavel Bure to open up was pretty amazing.

2. How Mike went to Miami to fing Gilbert Arenas' mother is pretty amazing. He was able to direct some personal experience to the story. But, never overstepped his bounds. Great dedication provides for a great story.

3. To every once in a while take time for yourself. It is easy to get caught up in your field and forget to enjoy life for yourself. Oh and to also spread out you body weight evenly when treading on thin ice.

ambar said...

Three things I learned from Mike Wise:

1. No matter how important your career is to you, you should always have some time for yourself.

2. It is very important to get an athlete outside of their "superstar athlete" environment. They are more likely to open up this way.

3. It really doesn't matter who you are...if you really like journalism, you can be a journalist no matter what.

Phil Murphy said...

Three things I learned from Mike Wise:

1. Find the story or angle that no one else is telling. It will make your piece infinitely more valuable.

2. Your story will be perceived differently by your readers. Anticipate this.

3. Taking the person you're interviewing out of his usual element -- like talking Pavel Bure on a car ride -- will often yield better dialogue. If this can be done, get the athlete out of his comfortable element every time.

matt said...

1. I learned about how important relationships are in this business.

2. It was interesting to hear how important it is to get athletes out of their environment to get better info on them.

3. With his heart-warming story I learned that life is a beautiful thing and sometimes we need to sit back and appreciate it.

Jeremy said...

Three things i learned from Mike Wise:

1. Mike Wise is awesome.

2. There's more to sports writing than just sports. It's very possible to develop a relationship with the people you write about, and that can be a good thing.

3. Working hard is important, but it's equally important to take time for yourself.

4. It doesn't matter how old you are, if you have talent and determination you can get into the field.

Nadia said...

I was unable to make it to class and am very dissapointed I missed Mike Wise due to my battery in my car. From reading everyone's Mike Wise Comments I Learned

1)Your Relationship With Your Sources is so valuable. People pay off later on.

2) Reporting Is Research

3) Get the Players and coaches out of their work enviornment. You can get better quotes.

Carlos said...

Mike Wise three things:

1. Athletes will disclose more information to you if they are away from their working environment.

2. Good research and good relationships will lead to good journalism and reporting.

3. A man's love for his dog is a beautiful thing. Everything happens for a reason.

Dylan Cavalheri-Gaiteri said...

1. If you can interview someone away from the rest of the media...Do it!!

2. Look for a different angle then everyone else is using.

3. Be aware that people perceive stories differently.

Robert said...

What I learned from Mike Wise:

1. Keep strong relationships with sources. It can get you unique story opportunities.

2. Look for the unique angle in a story.

3. Relationships with sources can lead to future stories on people close to the source. Mike Wise mentioned his relationship with Patrick Ewing and how it helped in his story on Patrick Ewing Jr.

Josh said...

Mike Wise: 3 things

1. Establish relationships because you never know when you are going to have to contact that source again.

2. Try to get the person out of the working environment. Example - the story when Mike first did a story for "The New York Times."

3. Relax and don't work so hard or you can lose the value of life.

Rida said...

Mike Wise: 3 things

1) Be as honest and up front with your boss as possible about investing your time in your stories.

2) It doesn't matter where you come from. If you really like this business you'll make it.

3) Get your main interviews out of the locker room and they will be more honest. They won't be afraid to break the "locker room code."

stephen ball said...

The three things I learned from Mike Wise were:

1. Have the ability to do large stories while doing the daily ones.

2. Make time for yourself.

3. No substitute for actually attending an event.