Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Who's your columnist #11

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14 comments:

Dechele said...

Why Kobe Won't Win MVP
By: Scoop Jackson

In this article Scoop gives his opinion on why he believes Kobe will not win MVP this season.

Scoop attributes this to the fact that although Kobe deserves the honor, he will not receive it for the simple fact that he is hated by to many people.

The article Scoop wrote is very much filled with his personal opinion and what he believes.

Here is the link:
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=jackson/080407&sportCat=nba

Latonya said...

Antonio Tarver says he's on top of his game - but he hasn't shown it

By: Tim Smith

In this article Smith discusses a doubleheader that will be aired on Showtime. The main point of the article is on Antonio Tarver, who hasn't been fighting well in recent matches.

I think the quotes in this article make the story. A light was shown on Smith's reporting skills because every quote seemed to be put into the perfect place within the story. The content of every quote was just enough to give the reader insight, while giving all of the necessary information.

The story is well worth the read, especially for Smith's good use of quotes.

Here is the link for your viewing pleasure:

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more_sports/2008/04/08/2008-04-08_antonio_tarver_says_hes_on_top_of_his_ga.html

Josh said...

By not expanding rosters, owners will pay price in long run:

Clayton has an interesting article this week. The beginning starts out with: "At the annual owners meeting in Palm Beach, Fla., NFL owners made a mistake."

The idea is enhancing the practice squad might be a good idea. In order to do that the owners would have to vote for more expanded offseason rosters.

Clayton did some mathematical equations and the result was that once you have a starter injured - it is going to be hard to replace the injured starter because a lot of teams don't even have room to fit everybody on the squad.

Money isn't the issue although Clayton points out that rookies get paid $1,000 a week during the preseason. The idea is the owners didn't even take any time to mull this issue over.

When you look at how many people are on a respective football team and how many spots are leftover for the practice squad - it doesn't look strong when a starter goes out with an injury. Interesting read.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/columns/story?columnist=clayton_john&id=3338600

Mike Coppinger said...

http://sports.espn.go.com/espnmag/story?id=3336422

The biggest sports story of 2007 didn't end happily.

by Bill Simmons

I have now read this column four times and each time it is as funny as entertaining as the last.

Simmons writes about the much-talked about Barry Bonds saga, but he doesnt re-hash it all.

He instead writes about his favorite 90210 episode, in which Steve and his father compete in a father-son golf tourney against another father and his baseball star son, played by none other, than Bonds himself.

The ironic part of the episode, is the climax, in which Steve discovers that his Dad is cheating by using juiced-up golf balls to improve his drives. His father confesses that he is afraid his skills are deteriorating due to age and that he needed the extra edge.

...Sound familiar?

Simmons is beyond words, that Barry Larson, played by Bonds, in an tv episode 14 years ago, didnt learn the lesson of the show.

And now, Barry lives on, not on ESPN Classic, but on SoapNet.

If only Barry would have paid closed attention to the moral of the story, he might not be in this position.

Sean said...

"Coach Cal a beaten man--barely" by Bob Ryan

Bob Ryan's column on the NCAA Championship Game focused upon Memphis Coach John Calipari, who was of interest to his Boston Globe audience because Calipari used to coach the University of Massachusetts.

Ryan's column had an edge to it, evident from its beginning:

"The Memphis Tigers came within two shots of going undefeated.

Shoulda.

Coulda.

Woulda."

Ryan, while describing the game, focused upon Calipari's arguable coaching mistakes and his losing probably his best chance ever to win the national championship.

www.boston.com/sports/colleges/mens_basketball/articles/2008/04/09/coach_cal_a_beaten_man_-barely/

Nadia said...

Once again, Tiger fails to muster a major charge
-Joe Posnanski

Posnanski really digs into Tiger Woods in this article. Giving tiger little slack and expecting more out of him. Even shots that Tiger made that were good Posnanski calls "OK".

It was a very different type of story and very similiar at the same time. Posnanski seemed to have just been let down in Tigers play and showed it through his column.

http://www.kansascity.com/180/story/574671.html

Will said...

"If Beasley goes, K-State shouldn't act jilted" By Jason Whitlock

This week Whitlock writes about Beasley leaving Kansas State for the pros. At the time the article was written Beasley had not made his announcement yet so Whitlock actually discusses what he thinks will happen if Beasley goes.

The basic message of the story is that Whitlock hopes if Beasley goes that Kansas State fans will not feel jolted.

What is interesting is that Whitlock uses the analogy of a break-up to describe the Beasley situation.

You can read the story here.
http://www.kansascity.com/sports/columnists/jason_whitlock/story/574640.html

Jeremy said...

Jayson Stark's latest column "So many key players on the shelf" concerns the unusual number of injuries to high-profile players.

Many teams across the board are struggling as a result of key players being lost to injuries, according to Stark. For example, Seattle closer J.J. Putz is injured, and the Mariners have already lost a handful of games in the late innings.

The column is very interesting since you don't usually see an entire column devoted to injuries. I had no idea that many of the players that Stark names were even injured. Stark also throws in some other little factoids for good measure.

As usual, Stark's style is entertaining and very casual, yet he doesn't lose his analytical edge. You can definitely tell by his writing and analysis that Stark knows the game and follows it closely. He provides enough information to maintain the interest of well-informed fans, while still providing enough background to draw in more casual fans.

Check it out:
http://proxy.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=stark_jayson&page=rumblings

Phil Murphy said...

Boycotts, partial or otherwise, won't have the desired effect
By: Jim Caple

Jim Caple's column this week is different than of his any that I have read. It's the first politcally-oriented piece I've seen -- and scrolling through his archives, his first since at least Oct. 10, 2007.

He comments on the Olympic Games, but moreover the attempts of protesters to extinguish the torch as it travels from to city to city en route to its final destination, Beijing.

Caple's lede is his common, sarcastic jab at his topic as he gives an Olympic-like, degree-of-difficulty scoring system for the protesters' attempts to put out the 'eternal' flame.

Caple argues, then, that the most-effective means of communicating displeasure of the treatment of the indogenous Tibetans and Sudanese by the Chinese government would not be boycotting the games entirely. He claims that this would punish only the non-participating athletes and remove an opportunity to have one's opinion heard on an international stage.

He offers a number of alternative solutions, such as boycotting the opening ceremonies or making a display on the medal stand, "a la Tommie Smith and John Carlos."

It was quite impressive to see how Caple can take a serious, widely-known global issue and still effectively make commentary in his personal, sarcastic tone.

He didn't not have to alter his voice despite writing on a new, more serious topic. I envy that ability.

I would not suspect this to be the last column on the Games, as he has already written on Michael Phelps since this column. I'll be very interested to see how his angles evolve as the heat of summer -- and that on the Chinese government -- continues to rise.

Click here for Caple's column.

Robert said...

"AL Central could be 5-team race,"
By Chris De Luca

De Luca mentioned that the AL Central has lived up to the expectation of being one of the toughest divisions in baseball this year.

Before the season began, it was widely speculated that the Detroit Tigers and Cleveland Indians would be competing for first place in the AL Central.

But the Tigers are 3-10 despite having the second highest payroll in baseball. The Indians' pitching has struggled despite being one the better pitching teams in 2007.

This presents an opportunity to the other teams in the AL Central. De Luca pointed out that the Kansas City Royals have improved and are currently in first place.

It should be interesting to see if the Royals and Twins, predicted to finish at the bottom of the division, can continue to exceed expectations throughout the season.

Here is the link:
http://www.suntimes.com/sports/deluca/891716,CST-SPT-deluca13.article

Carlos said...

tmpTiger's slam bid ends too soon

By: Woody Paige

In this article Paige's tone sounds disappointed about Tiger's loss this weekend at the Masters. He starts off by saying that Trevor Immelman won the Masters, and that the golf season ended on Sunday. Wait till' 2008

He had written a couple of articles before about Tiger's prediction that a Grand Slam victory (winning all four major tournaments) this year was totally plausible. He was waiting to write about Grand Slam number one for Tiger, but instead, he had to give credit to Immelman.

It seems as if Paige is waiting for Tiger to accomplish this feat because golf needs some extra juice to get us off of our seats the way that other sports charge us with energy.

Paige does a good recount of Tiger's performance, of the course conditions and of the leaders that were at some point in contention. However, everyone was tuned in to watch Tiger dominate the sport like we're used to seeing him. Paige is demonstrating how de sensitized we've become to Tiger winning a tournament, and how we overlook just how good the rest of the golfers are on Tour.

This says a lot about Tiger's greatness. Second place just isn't good enough for our expectations.

http://www.denverpost.com/paige/ci_8914624

Elliot Fox said...

There's No Mastering Sunday Predictions

By: Tom Boswell

In this article Boswell discusses the two types of predictions of who would win the Masters this past Sunday.

Once again, Boswell uses snappy word choice and reflects on the past events that have occurred in the Masters.

The question he angles his article most towards is:

Will Tiger win the Masters being down 6?

He covers the events that occurred on Saturday giving great facts about all of the top five leaders, such as what they have previously done and what are the possibilities of them winning.

This was an interesting article to read because Boswell's coverage of the Msters is similar to how he covers other sports event.

Check out more at:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/12/AR2008041202607_pf.html

stephen ball said...

Mike Wise wrote several articles this week, but I will focus on his article about the Capitals/Flyers playoff series.

Here Wise states the obvious in that the Caps are being our hussled and muscled three games into the series.

Wise writes that if the Caps are going to get past the Flyers, they'd better toughen up.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2005/03/24/LI2005032402723.html

Eric said...

Shoot till you drop must be Wings' credo
By: Mitch Albom

The depth of knowledge that Albom has for the sports he writes about is apparent to the readers. Albom is able to paint a picture in words to place the reader in the action.

In addition to the knowledge Albom also is able to tell a story unlike many others. Using analogies with precision and expertise it seems. The story flows, the images come to life, and the reader is drawn more and more into his writing techniques.

Albom's quotes and transitions make for an easy read. While he is bringing up the most pertinent information that the reader needs.


To read this article:
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080419/SPORTS05/804190375/1082/COL01