Monday, February 9, 2009

Who's your columnist #4

Your comment must be posted no later than 30 minutes before the Tuesday Feb. 17 class.

You must include the URL of the column so that your classmates can read the column, too.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Pictured at right: Michael Wilbon of the Washington Post. Brendan Murphy is following the cross-platform PTI star this semester.

17 comments:

bmurphy6 said...

Brendan Murphy
Communication 371-001
Sports Reporting/Klein
February 11, 2009

Sports Columnist #4

Tom Verducci's article discusses the interview between baseball columnist Peter Gammon's and New York Yankee's third baseman Alex Rodriguez. This story stood out to me because Verducci criticizes Peter Gammons, a well-respected sports journalist, for his failed interview.

Verducci writes of Gammons' inability to follow up on specific questions during the 30 minute discussion. For example, Verducci writes:

Like all things Rodriguez, though, it is never so simple. The calculation to his story was both clever and clumsy, and sloppy questioning left much to be desired. For instance, ESPN's Peter Gammons handed Rodriguez his own timeline by asking, "You're saying that time period was 2001, 2002 and 2003?" And when Rodriguez responded, "That's pretty accurate, yes" (emphasis mine), Gammons, as he did throughout the interview, stuck to the script and did not follow up.

I thought it was an interesting way to spin the column because I personally was not impressed with A-rod's interview. I felt no real information came out of the interview and Verducci makes a good claim why.

Here is the link:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/tom_verducci/02/10/arod.admits/index.html

Colby Prout said...

Colby Prout
Comm 371-001
cprout@gmu.edu
Feb 11 2009

http://www.ringtv.com/blog/326/margarito_loses_his_second_battle/

This week Michael Rosenthal covered the cocnclusion of the Margarito illegal tape job mini-saga. The conclusion is that the boxer, Antonio Margarito and his trainer Javier Capetillo had their boxing licenses suspended for a year in the state of California.

A one year suspension of a boxing license is the maximum penalty that can be assessed to a boxer and his trainer.

This was a true news story. Rosenthal attended the trial and conducted interviews with BOb Arum, Margarito's promoter, the attornies involved in the case and Capetillo. It's likely that the team will attempt to fight in other states, but other states will likely respect the California suspension.

This will disappoint boxing fans in the sense that there was set to be a rematch between Miguel Cotto and Margarito. Cotto experienced defeat at the hands of Margarito last summer (Cotto beat Mosley who beat Margarito...go figure), but now some around boxing are suspicious of Cotto's defeat at the hands of a journeyman fighter. That is, what was really going on with the hands?

Joe said...

In Rick Maese’s article on February 3, he describes the excitement of Super Bowl XXLIII. He writes that both teams took the spotlight as if it were a baton. Interesting how he made a reference to the Olympic relay race in describing the unpredictability of the game. One minute the Cardinals were ahead and then the Steelers regained the lead.

Maeses uses a lot of vivid imagery throughout the article. For instance he says

“Santonio Holmes caught the ball in the corner of the end zone - with only 0:35 glowing on the clock above him.”

“As the sandglass started moving like quicksand, the quarterback in black and gold marched back down the field”

He describes the Harrison interception return by comparing it to the video game frogger.
“Harrison stepped in front, though, catching the ball and moving through traffic like a game of Frogger.” A great description because Harrison is a big guy so he is slow and doesn’t move fast laterally similar to the video game.

Maese’s writes, “how far could Harrison he go? Well, you knew if you could appreciate how far he had already come”. He then goes into detail about Harrison’s failed past how he obtained his commercial drivers license in order to become a bus driver after being cut by the Ravens. Then, he was cut four times by the Steelers before he made the team. This year he got the Defensive Player of the Year award.

Evan said...

In his latest article, Bill Plaschke makes the statement that perennial underachiever Lakers' F Lamar Odom just played the greatest game of his career Sunday.
Hearing NBA superstar Kobe Bryant vomitting in the locker room before the game made the big man consider the fact that quite a lot of the game was riding on him, especially with C Andrew Bynum out for the season.
Odom scored 28 points and had 17 rebounds, including a double-double in the third quarter alone.
Plaschke suspects that the relatively soft-spoken Odom will have more chances to "turn on the green light" down the important stretch of the season.
His sarcasm concerning LeBron the the Cavs had me laughing out loud.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/columnists/la-sp-plaschke-lakers-cavaliers-2009feb09,0,5217742.column?page=2

Mike Foss said...

Rick Reilly writes a tongue-in-cheek column this week for this season's string of newly fired coaches. Reilly is disgruntled with the amount of grace and class coaches like Mike Shanahan, Lane Kiffin and Tommy Tuberville have shown after they've been fired.

In Reilly's world, recently fired coaches should rant and rage on their way out the door. He offers several possible (and humorous) options for dealing with the pains of losing one's coaching position.


http://sports.espn.go.com/espnmag/story?id=3898879

Ben Libby said...

Ben Libby
Communication 371-001
Sports Columnist #4
Feb 16 2009

http://www.boston.com/sports/columnists/bob_ryan_blog/2009/02/how_bout_dem_ea.html

Bob Ryan provides a interesting look at Boston College's upset of Duke in Men's Basketball.

Focusing more on BC's inability to remain consistent all year, Ryan insights the reader on BC's roller coaster season. For example, Ryan writes:

"They are the first team in the recorded history of mankind to defeat both Carolina and Duke while also losing to Harvard."

I found it remarkable for someone whose watched BC basketball for over 40 years to label this years team as the most unpredictable he's ever seen.

"It sounds so cliche-ish, but this is a bunch that really can beat anybody, or lose to anybody."

Ryan understands what it takes for BC to get into the NCAA tourney, as he explains,

"A 20-win team could be ignored in a crazy year, but I could not possibly imagine an ACC team winning 21 and not getting in."

As for BC, Ryan simple writes, "now they only need two," but he warns us, "understand it's still not a lock."

In giving recognition to BC's freshmen stud Reggie Jackson; who has built a reputation of coming up with clutch shots against the likes of UNC, and Duke, Ryan is doing the right thing in making this kid feel comfortable in the Boston sports world.

Ryan honors Al Skinner's ability to consistently build a NCAA contending team every year since he first came to the Heights. In a simple, but curious closure, Ryan writes:

"In all of Division 1, there is nobody -- nobody -- like Al Skinner."

Sara Ronken said...

It is evident that Harper feels strongly on the whole "A-Roid "drama. The Daily News columnist typically discusses matters in a somewhat unbiased manner, before allowing the reader to know how he really feels. However, with the case of A-Rod and his admittance to using steroids, Harper makes it very clear where he stands. He argues that the Yankees star was vague when answering questions regarding his use of steroids, and his claim that he "didn't know what he was taking" seemed all too familiar (anyone thinking of Barry Bonds?) Harper theorizes that A-Rod's apology was only to preserve his legacy and lessen the damage of his potential future placement in the Hall of Fame.
Overall, it was interesting to see the change in style that Harper went through. It proved that when he has a strong opinion, he will let his readers know, despite typically being a somewhat mellower columnist.

Harper's column can be found at:
http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/yankees/2009/02/09/2009-02-09_arod_must_inject_more_details_into_admis-1.html?page=0

Joe said...

Joe Grimberg
Communications 371/001
Sports Reporting/Klein
February 16

Sports Columnist #4


Rick Maese's February 1 article.

The article discusses the impact that Pat Tillman had on the Arizona Cardinals and the NFL. He writes how the NFL sent out a press release before the Super Bowl stating:

"NFL salutes service, courage and bravery in Super Bowl XLIII."

To Maese’s surprise, there was no mention of Pat Tillman who embodied all of these qualities.

The Cardinals however, will never forget a man who fundamentally changed their team.

Maese’s writes that after Tillman’s death, the Cardinals organization began to change for the better (due to his example). “
"He played a profound role in changing a franchise that had been mired for years in mediocrity.”

The Cardinals players and the organization have a deep sense of reverence for Pat Tillman. They admired his willingness to give up his multi-million dollar football contract to serve his country.

"I think a lot of players weren't here when he was here, maybe don't understand the big picture of what he brought to this organization and really what he did, what he really means to the bigger picture."

Adriane Wilson, the only current player on the roster that played with Tillman states:

"Being able to drop all his personal goals in football to the side, to go and do something he felt he needed to do to be a better person and to actually do something with his life, I think that speaks volumes for the type of person that he was and the type of character that he had".

The article was excellent. It was necessary because Tillman made a sacrifice that only a few are willing to make. Maese’s encourages the reader to remember service and sacrifice of Tillman, and all of the other brave men and women in the military

Joe said...

Edited post:

Sports Columnist #4


Rick Maese's February 1 article.

The article discusses the impact that Pat Tillman had on the Arizona Cardinals and the NFL.

He writes how the NFL sent out a press release before the Super Bowl stating:

"NFL salutes service, courage and bravery in Super Bowl XLIII."

To Maese’s surprise, there was no mention of Pat Tillman who embodied all of these qualities.

The Cardinals however, will never forget a man who fundamentally changed their team.

Maese writes that after Tillman’s death, the Cardinals organization began to change for the better (due to his example).

"He played a profound role in changing a franchise that had been mired for years in mediocrity.”

The Cardinals players and the organization have a deep sense of reverence for Pat Tillman. They admired his willingness to give up his multi-million dollar football contract to serve his country.

"I think a lot of players weren't here when he was here, maybe don't understand the big picture of what he brought to this organization and really what he did, what he really means to the bigger picture."

Adriane Wilson, the only current player on the roster that played with Tillman states:

"Being able to drop all his personal goals in football to the side, to go and do something he felt he needed to do to be a better person and to actually do something with his life, I think that speaks volumes for the type of person that he was and the type of character that he had."

The article was excellent. It was necessary because Tillman made a sacrifice that only a few are willing to make. Maese encourages the reader to remember the service and sacrifice of Tillman, and all of the other brave men and women in the military.

Grant Paulsen said...

My columnist is Tom Verducci. In his most recent column Verducci wrote about Peter Gammons' interview with Alex Rodriguez.

Verducci is always very opinionated. That's one of the reasons why I picked him. He said in his column that the money the Rangers paid Rodriguez was the worst investment in history. Like most of what Verducci writes, there are going to be a great number of people who disagree with that angle. But Verducci -- as always -- did a great job explaining himself. Just read the paragraph I've posted below.

"Hicks, the owner of the Texas Rangers, paid Rodriguez $150 million to play just three seasons in Texas and then go away. The Rangers finished in last place every year and Rodriguez admitted on Monday that he was dirty every year, pretty much assuring that this was the worst investment in sports history."

I found that to be hard to argue with.

His summary of Gammons' interview with the maligned slugger was a good read. He thought that the interview was conducted poorly. I did too for that matter. Verducci did a great job giving examples as to why he didn't like what Gammons asked -- or didn't ask -- Rodriguez. He cited specific examples of follow up questions that Gammons should have asked.

To read the column go to:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/tom_verducci/02/10/arod.admits/index.html

Eric Vitoff said...

In his latest article, Bill Simmons writes his annual NBA trade value rankings column.

The format is the same each year. He begins in the form of a normal column, then discusses players that were on the list last year that are not on now, then discusses bubble players, then proceeds to list the top 40.

There are sidebars on the column that explain what factors went into the rankings, including quality of contract, age, and what the rankings actually mean.

"Neither San Antonio nor Orlando would make a Howard-Duncan trade, but the Spurs would at least say, 'Wow, Dwight Howard's available?' and have a meeting about it while the Magic would say, 'There's no frickin' way we're trading Dwight Howard.' That counts in the big scheme of things."

Simmons explains that the list goes from 40-1, the lower the number the higher the trade value.

After each player, Bill Simmons talks about the player and why he is where he is on the list, complete with Simmons' trademark humor and snarkiness. It always amazes me that he can come up with so much funny content and useful basketball information in the same place.

Eric Vitoff said...

Oh, and here's the link:

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/090212

Diana Friedman said...

Diana Friedman

In Tom Boswell's most recent article, his representation of A-Rod is particularly interesting.

While in a way, he is defending his recent actions and the way he has responded to it, he does so with getting "shots" in. For instance Boswell makes the statement "Also, Rodriguez's character -- or his lack of it -- lends credence to his confession Monday."

I find it fascinating the way he brings his opinion of A-Rod in clearly through his writing while still giving the facts, and maybe even giving him the benefit of the doubt.

This really encompasses the fact that a columnist has the ability to bring his or her opinion in as long as their facts are interesting and factual.

URL:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/10/AR2009021002167.html

Kevin Healy said...

Woody Paige's most recent article deals with the hometown Denver Broncos.

Paige's focus is owner Pat Bowlen and his relationships with the head coaches of the franchise.

Bowlen is described as a "yes man". Paige describes all the times the owner said yes to former coach Mike Shanahan who was known as one of the most powerful head coaches in the league. He emphasizes the times Bowlen should have said "no".

Paige then describes Bowlen's past dealings with other head coaches who have had unusual decision making power.

Paige closes by stating that things have finally changed in Denver.

"Now Bowlen has a coach who will coach and a general manager who will manage. They will work together, supposedly, and work under the owner. Bowlen will be a yes man and a no man. And there will be more pressure on the head man."

http://www.denverpost.com/paige

Colin Fitzgerald said...

Colin Fitzgerald
Comm 371-001
Sports Reporting/Kline
February 17, 2009

Len Shapiro is back this week with a very interesting column about the National Public Radio and its new coverage of the National Hockey Leauge. Shapiro focuses on two employees of NPR, and how their love of hockey caused them to create new shows focused on the sport. Chris Nelson and Gemma Hooley have unlimited access to the players and coaches of the Washington Capitals. The NPR is an unlikely source of hockey news, but with a unique view of the players, provided via the recordings from the team bus and hotels, gives every Capitals fan what they want, more coverage. Shapiro's column also has links to NPR to hear the broadcasts.

http:/www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dny/content/article/2009/02/12/AR2009021201315_2html.com

Andrew said...

In Nick's article this week, he discusses the hiring of Shack Harris as the Lions new personnel man.

As I stated with my first comment, Cotsonika does a good job of using quotes to tell the story instead of trying to tell the story in some other way.

The article is comprised mostly of Martin Mayhew's (Lions GM) comments of Shack and what role he will have with the team. Cotsonika also details Harris's history in football.

http://freep.com/article/20090212/SPORTS01/90212054/1049/SPORTS01/Mayhew++Shack+Harris+won+t+be++yes-man++in+Lions++front+office

Fox Parker said...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/09/AR2009020902436.html?sub=AR&sid=ST2009020902486&s_pos=

Like almost every other columnist in the U.S., no the world, Mike Wise talked about Alex Rodriguez's admission to using performance-enhancing drugs(PEDs).

Wise said the other 103 names should be released. In doing this he challenged fellow Washington Post Columnist Tom Boswell.

Wise said that we should have access to the other names not so we can vilify the players who used, but so we can vindicate those who abstained from using drugs and thus fought to keep the game pure.

This is a new take on the approach to steroid use in baseball. I like that Wise is trying to focus on the few bright spots in Baseball's dark domicile, but I think that, no matter what happens, this "era" (I hate that word, eras are longer than decades. Its silly to use) it will be a stain on baseball forever.

If the names are released, sure we will look at the players that didn't use and give them a nice pat on the back, but no more then a second or two will pass before we blast the users and put each of them through a merciless inquisition.

The users are all anyone wants to talk about. Partly because we love controversy, but mostly because all the users hold all of baseball's sacred records.

They ruined the record books!

So? What are you going to do, re-write them all or put asterisks next to all of them? If you want to keep steroid in baseball forever, sure, put asterisks next to everything. Hell, put an asterisk next to Bartman's catch.

It doesn't matter one bit what baseball does. The only way to heal this steroid-caused wound is with time and tough drug policies, to insure the future "integrity" (another stupid word that doesn't belong) of the game.

In time the questions about steroids will diminish and baseball headlines will fill with phrases that truly embody the American past-time, like "Cubs miss the Playoffs" and "Mets Squander Division Lead."

So release the names or don't release them. Baseball can't fix its past, but it can insure a clean tomorrow. The question is-- will it?