Monday, March 30, 2009

Who's your columnist #11

Your comment must be posted no later than 30 minutes before the Tuesday April 7 class.

You must include the URL of the column so that your classmates can read the column, too. Let me know if you have any questions.

14 comments:

bmurphy6 said...

Brendan Murphy
Communication 371-001
Sports Reporting/Klein
Who is your columnist #11
Michael Wilbon

In Michael Wilbon's article, No Wrong Choice for MVP, he discusses the close race between the NBA's elite. The league's top three, Kobe, Lebron and D-Wade have all had electrifying seasons. Wilbon highlights the different circumstances surrounding each candidate's situation. D-Wade does not have the supporting cast of Lebron or Kobe, nor the impressive record, but he is making it work. The Heat find themselves in the playoff hunt as Wade leagues the young Heat. Wilbon interviews former standout MVPs Shaq and and Steve Nash for their insight. The race is coming down to the last ten games of the season. Lebron has a slight advantage because of their NBA best record and an impressive 32-1 record at home.

bmurphy6 said...

Link to above post.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/24/AR2009032401694_2.html?sid=ST2009032403678

Christopher Brooks said...

In Gary Parrish's "Final Four forecast: shivers, anti-Detroit sentiments ... and Tar Heels," he discusses what to expect this weekend in Detroit in the semis and final.

But first, he is not happy it is in Detroit, because it is going to be cold and wet. Parrish hates the cold.

There are four story lines this Final Four:

1. Hansbrough's last chance to win a title before he goes to the NBA.

2. Michigan State is playing in their home state, just 91 miles from the Breslin Center in East Lansing.

3. Villanova finished fourth in the Big East, yet they are in the Final Four of the NCAA -- the Big East is SOOOO good.

4. The UConn Huskies made it, despite the surrounding "cheating" scandal.

He then gives rankings and RPI and crunched the numbers for the four teams.

Congrats to Jay Wright for making it to his first final four. The other coaches are veterans at this.

Calhoun: 3rd Final Four, 2 Titles
Williams: 7th Final Four, 1 Title
Izzo: 5th Final Four, 1 Title

He has UNC defeating the Connecticut Huskies in the title game with Tyler Hansbrough being the MOP.

Pack your coat and scarf Parrish! If you don't want to go, then I will, haha!

http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/story/11564637

joe said...

In Rick Maese’s article, he looks at the recent run by the Maryland Terps women’s basketball team. He writes about the 2006 lady Terps championship season, which featured a junior, two sophomores and two freshmen.

Maese believed along with countless others, that this Maryland women's team would be a regular visitor to the Final Four. The team was that talented.

Maese writes that on paper there is almost a sense of inevitability that the Maryland lady Terps will continue to win. Maese gets a quote from senior Marissa Coleman who states “But on paper doesn’t matter”. Maese then transitions by stating:

“On paper, the winner of Monday night's Raleigh Regional final between top seed Maryland and No. 3 Louisville will advance to the national semifinals.”

Maese writes that if Maryland defeats Louisville, they have a chance to not only cap off another successful season but the lady Terps can make a single defining statement for their basketball program.

However, if Maryland comes up short and fails to make the final four, they will be defined as underachievers who despite having tons of talent can only lay claim to one national championship.

Maese writes that Maryland has too much talent and experience not to make the Final Four. Out of the remaining teams, Maryland is the only team with players (Toliver and Coleman) who know what it is like to win a national championship.

Maese states that since the brackets were announced, the confidence level of the lady Terps has been extremely high. But not like that “na├»ve” 2006 team or the “self assured” 2007 team that lost in the Elite Eight.

Maese quotes Coleman the hero of the lady Terps come from behind victory against Vanderderbilt. The quote sums up how confident this Maryland team is.

“I don't think there's a coach in this country honestly who can devise a plan or have some defensive strategy that can stop us.”

Maese uses some imagery to describe the determination of their two seniors Coleman and Toliver.

“For the two seniors, both determined to pull this team through the bracket like a pair of stubborn oxen, this is all about ending a career the way everyone had imagined three springs ago.”

Evan said...

"I have never seen an NCAA tournament game where one team was so loved..."

This is in reference to Villanova's hosting of Plaschke's beloved UCLA Bruins three Saturday's ago.

Plaschke never hesitates in being one-sided, but is equally unhesitant when it comes to bashing whomever he feels needs to be based, mo matter if they play for L.A. or Timbuktu.

This is the first time i've read a Plaschke column concerning one city and one stadium's complete one-sidedness and wasn't rolling my eyes fondly at what I would assume was apparent Plaschke sarcasm.

But, no, he's serious.
Most sportsfans that aren't from Philly HATE Philly fans and Philly teams. It's understandable that Plaschke is no different, but it's amazing how SINCERE the man is in this article.
Philadelphia sports IS crazy; i'm surprised the Bruins made it out alive at all.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/college/basketball/la-sp-plaschke-ucla21-2009mar21,0,5351007.column

Kevin Healy said...

Woody Paige's most recent article (http://www.denverpost.com/paige) focuses on North Carolina point guard Ty Lawson and his path to the national championship game.

Paige uses the Fisher Price basketball hoops Lawson received when he was 3 and 10 to illustrate just how long this trip to the Final Four has been in the making.

Paige then goes on to tell how Lawson was one bad decision away from playing with Denver's Nuggets instead of Chapel Hill's Tar Heels.

Paige utilizes his local connections and reveals that the Nuggets had quietly promised to draft Lawson 20th overall in last years draft after the then 20 year old had declared for the NBA draft. The aforementioned bad decision resulted in him being charged with driving after consuming alcohol. The Nuggets began to distance themselves, and Lawson returned to school.

Paige takes advantage of a local story he has in depth access to to frame a profile on the starting point guard for the favored Tar Heels in the upcoming Final Four championship game.

Diana Friedman said...

Diana Friedman

In Tom Boswell's Monday article "The Young-Armed Nats, Out on a Limb" he talks about the upcoming season for the Washington Nationals.

The thing that stood out about this article is the presence of more statistics than normal. It shows a good variance in Boswell's writing.

It is also interesting how he gives both sides of the story for the possible season of the Nats. On one hand he shows optimism at the possibility of a good season, yet is sure to bring up his doubts as well.

URL:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/05/AR2009040502226.html

Andrew said...

In this week's article, Nick Cotsonika talks about George Foster, the underachieving right tackle for the Detroit Lions. Foster, a former first-round pick, has had trouble landing a consistent starting role on any team he has played for.

Cotsonika sets up the article in chronological fashion, detailing Foster's troubles over the years with different offensive coordinators. Cotsonika ends the piece with "Now Foster will try to fit Scott Linehan's system" to give it something for the reader to think about.

http://www.freep.com/article/20090407/SPORTS01/904070342/1049/Will+Foster+fit+Linehan+s+plan?

Mike Foss said...

Rick Reilly has left me disenchanted. Again.

I remember in high school reading Reilly. He was edgy, sarcastic and intelligent.

His latest column, on UConn's Hasheem Thabeet is a sugary-sweet sob-story. A kid overcoming his environment to play college basketball at the highest level.

It's so cliche and so perfectly Reilly of late.

Don't get me wrong. It's a well written piece. But it lacks the bite of the old Reilly. There's no wit. Come back Rick Reilly.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espnmag/story?id=4032725

Colin Fitzgerald said...

Communication 371-001
Sports Reporting
Who is your columnist #11?

Sally Jenkin's article, A Promise Keeper, Even in Defeat, told the story of Oklahoma's Courtney Paris. Paris had guaranteed a national championship for Oklahoma or promised to repay her scholarship. Well Oklahoma lost to Louisville in the NCAA semifinal, and Paris says she doesn't have the money now, but she intends to make good on her promise. Jenkin's makes compelling comparisons between Paris and Joe Namath, saying that while both guaranteed championships, Paris placed "a stack of responsibility on herself." Jenkins describes Paris as the force that held her team together through out the season.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/05/AR2009040502432_2.html?sub=AR&sid=ST2009040600070

Fox Parker said...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/03/30/AR2009033003382.html

This week Mike Wise took on the Maryland women's basketball team.

Not literally. They would crush him.

He wrote about their loss in the elite eight to Louisville. Wise focused on the two seniors of the the team, Kristi Toliver and Marissa Coleman.

Wise talked about the upwelling of emotion the two felt after playing their last game in a Terrapin uniform.

Wise used quotes from the two a complimented them with articulate attribution tags. He wrote a little on the game but only to point the most important events.

Wise later went on to shed some light on the angst present in Terps coach Brenda Frese's relationship with other coaches in women's college basketball.

According to Wise and Doris Burke, whom he interviewed for this piece, other coaches, including Jeff Walz Louisville's coach and former Frese assistant, don't like the style of basketball that the Terps play.

The lack of defense by the Terps cause other coaches to "root against" Frese.

This was the most interesting part of the column for me. It shows that WHILE (yes Prof. Klein, while) columns are normally all about opinion and story telling, a good writer can add in info that is completely new to the reader.

I also thought that Wise interviewing Burke really complimented the column and made it unique.

Eric Vitoff said...

In the past week, Simmons focused more on podcasting than writing columns. But he did say that he finally finished the rough draft of his book about basketball, due to come out in October 2009.

One of the podcasts was with John A. Walsh, an ESPN big-wig, and Simmons' boss. They both admit that they get along, but have artistic differences from time to time. They discussed the dying newspaper industry and related topics.

Simmons also talked with Bill Hader of SNL. Simmons is an avid SNL fan and often has cast members on his podcast.

He also had podcasts with Le Anne Schreiber, ESPN's ombudsman, his friend JackO, and ESPN fantasy guru Matthew Berry. I am very excited that the baseball season just started :-).

Here is the link to Simmons' page on ESPN.com, where you can access all of his columns and podcasts;

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/simmons/index

Grant Paulsen said...

Tom Verducci wrote about the year-after effect for the young pitchers in major league baseball.

His opinion is that pitchers who are 25 or younger are at risk of arm problems the year after the number of innings they worked increased by at least 30 innings.

He labels Jon Lester, Cole Hamels, and Tim Lincecum as a few of the 10 pitchers who might be at risk. He adds a graph to his column that is easy on the eyes. It breaks down what he says in his column. The graph shows each players age, innings from 2008, innings from the previous year, and the difference between the two.

He makes his point by calling attention to a plethora of starting pitchers who fell victim to the "Verducci" effect.

He also projects that the LA Dodgers could have major rotational problems, based on the fact that Clayton Kershaw and Chad Billingsley are both "at risk."

Sara Ronken said...

I enjoyed reading Harper’s column this week on the new Yankees stadium. He described the controversy surrounding the finished project and gave information to support each side. On the one hand, the new stadium is seen as tacky and awkward against the setting of the nation’s declining economy. It has huge gold lettering and grand limestone exterior that, according to Harper, make it appear as more of a palace than a stadium. The new—and some would say not improved—ticket prices are also a subject of debate. The prices were set in place before the economy started tanking, and now many are criticizing their increase. Even Steinbrenner admitted the prices were a little outrageous.

However, if the Yankees actually make it to the World Series and perhaps take home the title, the stadium seems fitting for the baseball royalty. Harper argued that fans will be more likely to accept the new ticket prices and embrace the stadium if the Yankees give them some hope.

In this particular column, Harper gave more of an unbiased review of the controversy surrounding the stadium and really refrained from giving his own opinion. While sometimes I enjoy that way of writing, I further enjoy it when he gives the readers a chance to formulate their own opinions, before strongly stating his own. Perhaps he just doesn’t have an opinion on this particular subject.

The column can be found at: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/yankees/2009/04/03/2009-04-03_new_yankee_stadium_has_classic_feel_but_-2.html?page=1